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caramelfringe:

offensive things to call people when they’re mean to you:

  • crispy nipple
  • the white stringy things in bananas
  • tangled umbilical cord
  • nash grier
  • iceberg lettuce: world’s blandest green
  • watery afro
  • fountain water at school that never tastes right
  • voldemort’s breathing holes
  • ヽ༼ຈل͜ຈ༽ノ
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ignisambulamecum:

saturnineaqua:

marimopet:

armisael:

please watch avril lavigne’s new video it is so much worse than you are imagining as you are reading this, it is so much worse than anyone could have ever guessed it would be

this is some awful 2006 type horse shit

i just kept burying my face in my hands and saying “oh my god….oh my god……”

i know exactly who i’m showing this to tomorrow.

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It’s hard to shake the idea that Game Of Thrones, the show, doesn’t see a problem with pushing a scene from complicated, consensual sex to outright rape. It would be easier to accept that idea if it were clear what the show was trying to do with those changes. Rape is a tricky thing to use as character development, for either the victim or the rapist; doing it twice raises a lot of red flags. It assumes that rape between characters doesn’t fundamentally change the rest of their story—and it assumes that the difference between consent and rape is, to use the parlance, a “blurred line.”

Unfortunately, the show is wrong, on both counts. Changing a scene from consensual sex to rape is not just a pedantic issue of accuracy—it’s a problem with story. The Daenerys Targaryen who falls in love with a man who granted her respect when no one else would is different from the Daenerys Targaryen who fell in love with her rapist. It changes that relationship. (Dany falling in love with Drogo, and calling him her “sun and stars,” makes a whole lot more sense now, doesn’t it?)

Similarly, Jaime is a figure of chivalric love in the books—despite his arrogance and ruthlessness, his devotion and sense of duty to Cersei, the only woman he has ever loved, is so fervent as to border on adoration. Admittedly, the show can’t rely on his point-of-view chapters, as the book does, to communicate that love. But given what we have seen Cersei Lannister capable of—her ex-husband is hardly the only man she’s had killed—is it even conceivable that she would stand for it? Jaime raping Cersei is a major anomaly for these two characters—even based purely on what we’ve seen in the show. It’s just not something that either character would do.

Sonia Saraiya, Rape of Thrones: Why are the Game of Thrones showrunners rewriting the books into misogyny? (via thedespicablemouse)
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